Timothy M. Denton

Success Through Understanding Technology

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Industry News

Subcategories from this category: Internet, Canada

Posted by on in Industry News

 

Hey there! Sometimes you have a good day, and that was captured last year in an interview with Senator Pamela Wallin on the subject of the then Bill C-10, now reintroduced as Bill C11, the update to the Broadcasting Act. The issues are exactly the same.

https://www.buzzsprout.com/1154654/9553337

Freedom of speech, censorship, what the Internet accomplished and why the Broadcasting model seeks to destroy it. No innovation without permission.

 

 

 

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Posted by on in Industry News

Inquisition - Wikipedia

The CRTC recently reproved Radio Canada for discussing Les Negres Blancs d'Amerique, an anti-capitalist and anti-English tract of the 1960s. Apparently Radio Canada should not have mentioned the title even in the French language. Only two Commissioners dissented, pointing out that the Constitutional right to free speech might be involved, a point totally ignored by the other Commissioners.

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Posted by on in Industry News

 

The Trudeau government’s plans to regulate the global internet and interfere with Canadians’ freedom of expression continues to confuse the legislation’s proponents.

 While opponents to the Online Streaming Act (Bill C-11) are clear that the CRTC's authority over the online world will restrict citizens’ ability to communicate without restriction, Parliamentary hearings this week elicited the deep incoherence of its defenders.

 

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Posted by on in Industry News

Ian Scott, chairman of the CRTC, claims that Bill C-11, the new draft of the Broadcasting Act, will not result in user generated content being regulated.

That is not true.

 A loaded gun is not intended to be used for murder, but it remains a dangerous weapon. Likewise, the direction of a car is better determined by the way the wheels are pointed than by the turn signals. History has shown that the CRTC will regulate up to the last millimeter of its statutory authority.

 

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Posted by on in Industry News

Lipstick on the same old pig. I will let Peter Menzies say it for me. 

There has been a lot of talk about liberty lately. Some, like those in the truckers’ convoys and blockades, want a lot more of it. Others, startled at the prospect of mingling with the unvaccinated and unmasked, want less of it, as does the Trudeau government, which on Feb. 14 invoked the Emergencies Act.

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Posted by on in Industry News

Pamela and I dig into the reasons for promoting speech controls, as the Liberals are trying to do in their Online Harms proposals and Bill C10. We live in a time of extreme cultural insecurity. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q-f9WJRM1Gs&ab_channel=NoNonsensewithPamelaWallin 

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Posted by on in Industry News

 

A F-100D aircraft dropping a napalm bomb near Bien Hoa, South Vietnam

 

My colleague Philip Palmer delivered this address to the PIAC conference. Caution - it has a large blast radius.

C-10: Three Failures

There are tomes to be written about C-10, its ambitions and its failings. I would like to make 3 points:

First, the restriction of free speech by the regulation of Internet streaming services as broadcasting cannot be justified under the Charter of Rights.

Second, section 3 of the Broadcasting Act, as amended by C-10, fails as a broadcasting policy for the Internet age.

Third, the expansion the Broadcasting Act to Internet streaming services is unconstitutional both as beyond the powers of Parliament and as contrary to the Charter of Rights.

 

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Posted by on in Industry News

 

 

 

The Basic Question

Is there something in the Internet which should inform our approach and constrain the application of broadcasting concepts to it?  I think there is: permissionless innovation. 

 

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Posted by on in Industry News

 

 

People think that fascism appears as gangs of thugs in black uniforms beating people up. I suspect that it first appears by thought and word, before it manifests as physical violence. 

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Posted by on in Industry News

 

Sir Douglas Barrett, QC, King's Bench, 1692-1764, precursor of Canada's broadcasting legal fraternity

 

 

I see that broadcasting lawyer Doug Barrett is suggesting we vote anything but Conservative because they threaten delay in the passage and implementation of the Broadcasting Act, as expressed in the late bill C10. If you care abut people's freedom to communicate across the Internet without prior permission, I would suggest that you vote for anyone who comes closest to scrapping the Broadcasting Act, and while they are at it, dismantling the CRTC and starting again.

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Posted by on in Industry News

 

I asked Ben Klass what this graph means. He replied:

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Posted by on in Industry News

How far should universities restrict freedom of speech? | Times Higher  Education (THE)

 

The new Broadcasting Act, Bill C10, may be stymied in the Senate of Canada, but the actual content of its policy objectives has just been released. Heritage Canada has published “Guiding Principles on Diversity of Content online”. The Guiding Principles have several advantages over the policy objectives of section 3 of the Broadcasting Act. They are not legislated, they can be revised and adapted according to the how the technologies or the societies that adopt them evolve, and they have no legally binding force. They have only the force of the large platforms to back them, if they sign on to the Guiding Principles.

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Posted by on in Industry News

 

 

Good afternoon, everyone, and welcome to the Annual General Meeting of the Internet Society, Canada Chapter.

 

What a year it has been! The vision of the Internet that we have is one that is open, accessible and affordable.

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Posted by on in Industry News

The Revolt of The Public and the Crisis of Authority in the New Millennium by [Martin Gurri]

C10, the government’s new Broadcasting Act, is a panicked reaction of elites to the power of the Internet. All the stated rationales are inadequate to explain the totalitarian impulse to control speech that oozes from the new bill. The very excess of the proposed Act is a sure sign of darker intentions.

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Posted by on in Industry News

The purpose of this note is to draw your attention to certain features of the draft legislation that may not be apparent and that will have long term negative consequences for Canadians generally.

The Act is not about broadcasting. It is about the licensing of expression through video on the Internet. The act declares almost all such expression to be “broadcasting” so that it can regulate it.

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Posted by on in Industry News

The purpose of this note is to draw your attention to certain features of the draft legislation that may not be apparent and that will have long term negative consequences for Canadians generally.

The Act is not about broadcasting. It is about the licensing of expression through video on the Internet. The act declares almost all such expression to be “broadcasting” so that it can regulate it.

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Posted by on in Industry News

 

 

The idea that democracy can be salvaged through the sanitization of the speech that sustains it is both confused and dangerous. The Canadian Commission on Democratic Expression thinks otherwise. On Wednesday this week the Commission announced a plan for the federal government to assert a measure of control over social media platforms by imposing a Duty to Act Responsibly and creating more agencies to work out what that entails.

 

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Posted by on in Industry News

 

 

 

Chris MacDonald, lately a commissioner of the CRTC, and Peter Menzies, former Vice Chairman for Telecommunications at the same agency, recently published a paper called Building Internet Access is Job 1.We think it is a useful contribution to public discussion of matters of national importance. There is much that the Internet Society likes. Before we get on to the subject of MVNOs[1], where we differ, we want to set forth our agreements of several large issues.

 

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Posted by on in Industry News

 

 

 

Chris MacDonald, lately a commissioner of the CRTC, and Peter Menzies, former Vice Chairman for Telecommunications at the same agency, recently published a paper called Building Internet Access is Job 1.We think it is a useful contribution to public discussion of matters of national importance. There is much that the Internet Society likes. Before we get on to the subject of MVNOs[1], where we differ, we want to set forth our agreements of several large issues.

 

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Posted by on in Industry News

 

 Chris MacDonald, lately a commissioner of the CRTC, and Peter Menzies, former Vice Chairman for Telecommunications at the same agency, recently published a paper called Building Internet Access is Job 1.We think it is a useful contribution to public discussion of matters of national importance. There is much that the Internet Society likes. Before we get on to the subject of MVNOs[1], where we differ, we want to set forth our agreements of several large issues.

 

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